Dominican Republic

Region Information

Overview

The Dominican Republic is the second largest and most populous country in the Caribbean, occupying the eastern two thirds of the island of Hispanola, adjacent to Haiti. To the east of the Dominican Republic is the Mona Passage, which separates it from Puerto Rico. Both the Atlantic Ocean to the north and the Caribbean Sea to the south produce rideable surf on an ideally indented coastline. While the Dominican Republic is a mountainous country, golden sandy beaches remain the main tourist attraction, which explains the high concentration of hotels and resorts on the Amber Coast, especially the 65km zone between Puerto Plata and Cabarete. Go surfing in Dominican Republic and learn with top surf camps.

 

Season & Weather

The north shore, referred to as "La Costa" by the locals, receives consistent North Atlantic swells between November and March. N swells are perfect for the Amber Coast, arriving from lows located off Florida, usually tracking NE towards Europe. These 2-15 ft (0,5- 5m) waves hit the exposed northern coastline and the major breaks receive up to 15 ft (5m) a couple of times a year. Early winter (November and December) is usually good. Prevailing winds are E/NE all year-round, getting super strong in winter and only a few spots around Sosua will remain offshore all day, so surf early in the morning before the trades kick in. The Caribbean cyclonic swells only produce waves for the south coast of the Dominican Republic, wher many spots will fire through the summer months. Tidal rancge remains micro; under 0,5 m

Surf Breaks

Next to the colonial fort in the tourist hub of Puerto Plata, a channel splits the reef of La Puntilla, offering intense rights and lefts on a head high northerly swell. The city's other option, Coffee Break is a reef peak worth checking when it's too small for La Puntilla. Compared to the developed Puerto Plata, Sosua is a real jewel of a beach town with coconut trees lining idyllic beaches. On the biggest northern swells Encuentro spots start closing-out, peaks will appear in Sosua Bay, groomed by offshore trades, creating a short, clean, sucky ride that's best going left. Also check La Boca on the southwest. The large Kite Beach hosts an outer reef A-frame that is a long paddle and handles the biggest N-NE swells.The north shore, referred to as "La Costa" by the locals, receives consistent North Atlantic swells between November and March. N swells are perfect for the Amber Coast, arriving lows located off Florida, usually tracking NE towards Europe. Early winter ( November and December ) is usually good. Surf early in the morning before the trade winds kick in.

 

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Guadeloupe